Mastering Welding Positions 4 Types, Symbols & Uses [PDF]

In this article, we shall learn about the different types of welding positions, their symbols, and their application, We have also provided a PDF of the same.

Welding Positions 
Welding Positions 1F and 1G
Welding Positions  2F and 2G
Welding Positions  3F and 3G
Welding Positions  4F and 4G

Introduction to Welding Positions

One of the critical aspects of welding is the welding position which is the determination of the direction of the weld and orientation of the workpiece. The four major welding positions: flat, vertical, horizontal, and overhead. Each welding position requires specific techniques to ensure efficient and successful welding. Welders must be familiar with each welding position and know how to adapt their techniques to get the desired results.

What Are Welding Positions

The technique of joining two or more metals together by the use of heat is known as Welding. It serves its purpose in different industries such as aerospace, construction, automotive, etc. The specific position to which a welder must join two metals or more is known as the Welding position.

The flat welding position is the most common and easiest to perform. In this position, the welder lays the metal flat on the welding surface, and the weld seam is horizontal. The horizontal welding position is where the welder must weld the joint in a horizontal position. It requires more skill and precision than the flat position. The vertical welding position is where the welder must weld the joint in an upright position. It is more challenging than the horizontal position as the welder must control the molten metal’s flow. The overhead welding position is the most challenging of all, and the welder must weld the joint from underneath, looking up.

Different skill sets and equipment are required for each welding position. It is important to understand the requirement of each position by the welder. To determine the appropriate welding position the welder must take into consideration the joint design, metal type and thickness of the joint, etc. For the best weld durability and quality, it is advised to use welding positions that comply with industry standards.

Welding Positions 
Welding Positions 1F and 1G
Welding Positions  2F and 2G
Welding Positions  3F and 3G
Welding Positions  4F and 4G

Purpose of Welding Positions

The important factor which is critical in determining the strength and quality of the final product is the position in which the job or component is welded. To achieve strong, stable, and other necessary requirements we must make use of these welding positions

The primary purpose of using these welding positions is to have the most effective and efficient weld on the job. The different positions are horizontal, vertical, flat, and overhead they are specified so one can have safe, easy, and efficient welding depending on the angle of the joint and location being welded

The flat welding position is where the weld is made on a flat surface, usually in a horizontal plane. Horizontal welding position is used when the joint being welded is in a horizontal plane, and the welder is positioned above the joint. The vertical welding position is used when the joint being welded is in a vertical plane, and the welder works from the bottom up.

The overhead welding position is used when the joint being welded is located above the welder’s head, and the welder works from underneath. Different welding positions serve different purposes depending on the location and angle of the joint being welded. Welders must have a good understanding of the different welding positions and how to use them to ensure that the welds are strong, stable, and meet the required specifications.

Types of Welding Positions

The Different types of Welding Positions are as follows

  • Flat Position [1F or 1G]
  • Horizontal position [2F or 2G]
  • Vertical position [3F or 3G]
  • Overhead Position [4F or 4G]
Photo by Weld.com

Flat Position [1F or 1G]

The flat welding position 1F or 1G is considered to be the easiest and quickest to learn. It involves laying the metal components to be joined flat and moving an electric arc horizontally across the workpiece. When welding in this position, the top portion of the joint is welded first, allowing the molten material to flow down into the edges or grooves.

Welding Positions 
Welding Positions 1F and 1G
Flat Welding Positions 1F and 1G
Flat Position [1F or 1G]

This position is denoted by the number “1” for flat and “G” for grooves welds. Welders can use the flat position to perform grooves, fillet, and butt welds by placing the joint or workpiece under the welding torches, allowing the molten metal to flow downwards, resulting in a complete and easy weld.

Horizontal position [2F or 2G]

The horizontal position, also known as 2F or 2G, is more complex than the flat position and requires a higher level of skill. The workpiece is held parallel to the welder’s body in this position. The torch is held at a 45-degree angle for fillet welds, and the weld axis is horizontal.

Welding Positions 
Welding Positions  2F and 2G
Horizontal Welding Positions  2F and 2G
Horizontal position [2F or 2G]

The horizontal position can be used for fillet or groove welds, depending on the type of weld. For fillet welds, the weld bead is placed where a vertical and horizontal piece of metal meets at a 90-degree angle, while for groove welds, the weld face will be along a vertical plane.

Vertical position [3F or 3G]

To perform a vertical position 3F or 3G weld, both the weld and the plate are located vertically. However, the main challenge is the accumulation of molten metal due to gravity. To prevent this, welders can use either a downhill or uphill technique.

Vertical position [3F or 3G]
Welding Positions 
Welding Positions  3F and 3G
Vertical Welding Positions  3F and 3G

For the uphill position, the torch is held at a 45-degree angle, and the lower metal of the workpiece is used to achieve a vertical climbing position. On the other hand, for the downhill position, the upper part of the workpiece is used, while the torch is still held at a 45-degree angle to achieve a smooth and efficient weld.

Overhead Position [4F or 4G]

Welding positions play a crucial role in determining the quality and strength of a welded joint. One such position is the overhead position, also known as the 4F or 4G position. This position requires the welder to work overhead, which can be challenging due to the force of gravity pulling the molten metal downwards.

Overhead Position [4F or 4G]
Welding Positions 
Welding Positions  4F and 4G
Overhead Welding Positions  4F and 4G

The 4F position is used for fillet welds on lap joints, while the 4G position is used for groove welds on a pipe or plate. Welders must be skilled in maintaining the right angle and travel speed to prevent the weld from sagging or dripping. Additionally, proper safety measures must be taken as the welder is working overhead, such as wearing protective gear and securing the workpiece. Overall, mastering the overhead position is essential for welders to produce high-quality welded joints that meet industry standards.

What are pipe welding positions?

Welding positions are an essential aspect of welding that refers to the orientation of the workpiece and the welding torch. There are various welding positions, and each one requires specific techniques, equipment, and skills. Among the most common welding positions are the 1G, 2G, 5G, and 6G pipe welding positions.

The 1G welding position, also known as the flat position, involves welding on a horizontal plane. In this position, the welder lays the workpiece flat and welds in a horizontal direction. The 2G position, also known as the horizontal position, involves welding on a vertical plane, where the welder moves the welding torch from side to side.

Pipe Welding Positions
Photo By Mechanical Nexus

The 5G welding position, also known as the horizontal-fixed position, requires the welder to weld a pipe that is fixed in a vertical position. The welder must move the welding torch in a circular motion while maintaining a consistent pace. The 6G welding position, also known as the inclined position, is considered the most challenging welding position. It requires the welder to weld a pipe that is fixed at a 45-degree angle.

In this position, the welder must move the torch in a circular motion while maintaining a consistent pace and maintaining the correct angle. In conclusion, understanding welding positions is essential for any welder to produce high-quality welds. The 1G, 2G, 5G, and 6G pipe welding positions are some of the most common positions that require different techniques and skills. Mastery of these positions can help a welder excel in their field and produce top-notch welding work.

What are Welding Procedure Specification Variables

The different welding procedure variables are as follows

  • Process
  • Electrode Specification
  • Electrode Diameter
  • Electrical Characteristics
  • Base Material Specification
  • Minimum Preheat and Interpass Temperature
  • Welding Current or Wire Feed Speed
  • CTTWD (Contact tip to work distance)
  • Arc Voltage
  • Travel Speed
  • Position of Welding
  • Post Weld Heat Treatment
  • Shielding Gas Type and Flow Rate
  • Joint Design Details
Types of Welds

Limitations of Welding Positions

  • Difficult access or manipulation
  • Quality and strength variations
  • Productivity impact
  • Material and welding process restrictions
  • Process limitations

Welders must understand these limitations and adjust their techniques accordingly to produce high-quality, durable welds. By mastering the different welding positions and their limitations, welders can become more efficient and produce high-quality welds for various applications.

Comparison between ISO Standard Positions and ASME/AWS Welding Positions

Sr.NoWelding Positions (ISO)Welding Positions (ASME / AWS)
1PA1G/1F
2PB2F
3PC2G
4PD4F
5PE4G
6PF3G Uphill
7PG3G Downhill
8PH5G Uphill
9PJ5G Downhill
10H-L0456G Uphill
11J-L0456G Downhill

FAQ

What are welding Positions?

Welding positions refer to the various orientations of the welding joint that a welder must work with. There are four primary welding positions: flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead. Knowledge of welding positions is essential for achieving high-quality welds, and different jobs require different techniques and skills to produce successful welds.

What Is 2G Welding Position?

The 2G welding position involves working on the top side of a horizontal joint, often used for welding pipes. This position is relatively comfortable and considered easier for welders compared to other positions. Understanding different welding positions is crucial for achieving high-quality welds in various applications.

What Is 2F Welding Position?

The 2F welding position involves working on the same plane as the weld, with the joint in a vertical position. This position is commonly used for fillet welds on vertical surfaces.

What Is 1G Welding Position?

The 1G welding position involves working on a joint that is in a horizontal plane and can be rotated. This position is commonly used for welding flat plates and is considered the easiest for welders.

What Is 5G Welding Position

The 5G welding position involves working on a joint that is in a horizontal plane and can’t be rotated, with the welder working from below the joint. This position is commonly used for welding pipes and is more challenging for welders

What are Pipe Welding Positions

Pipe welding positions refer to the various orientations of the pipe that a welder must work with. The four primary pipe welding positions are 1G, 2G, 5G, and 6G, each requiring specific techniques and skills to produce successful welds.

Conclusion

In conclusion, welding positions are critical to the success of a welding project. Knowing the different types of welding positions, their corresponding symbols, and their applications is essential for achieving a high-quality weld. Understanding the requirements of each welding position and how to properly position and manipulate the welding torch is crucial for producing solid and durable welds.

By mastering the different welding positions and their symbols, welders can improve their welding skills and produce high-quality welds for a variety of applications.

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